SHOW MENU

The Post Magazine Address Panel and its Decorative Border

Introduction

The Post Magazine first appeared on the 25th July 1840, just seven months after the introduction of "Uniform Penny Postage" and two months after the introduction of the worlds first postage stamp, the 1d black. Taking advantage of the reduced rates of postage, it was a significant commercial innovation, and probably the first publication in the world to be sent by post - hence its name.

The Post Magazine was initially sold pre-franked with a 1d black stamp ready for posting. At a later date it was sold without a stamp for mainly correspondence use. It was first sold to the public at 1½d and at 1d to advertisers (limited to 24 copies). Later it was sold at 1d without a stamp. A minimum of 5000 copies were printed each week.

The Post Magazine has been published continuously from its inception to the present day.

THE ADDRESS PANELS DECORATIVE BORDER

The following gives a description of the five types of address panel used for the Post Magazine.

TYPE I - This address panel is very elaborate, consisting of grape vines with the words "Post Magazine" and "Wine Office Court/Fleet Street" boxed within the border centrally at the top and bottom.

TYPE II - This address panel border changed to a more simple lined border with scrolls in all four corners. The words "Post Magazine" and "Wine Office Court/Fleet Street" are placed centrally above and below the lined border at the top and bottom.

TYPE III - This type of border changed to a simple lined border with scrolls in each corner but without the words "Post Magazine" and "Wine Office Court/Fleet Street".

TYPE IV - This address panel has no decorative border at all. It may be by design or an error during printing. It has information on each side of the address panel in an open style as in Type I, II and III.

TYPE IVa - This address panel has no decorative border as in Type IV but the information on each side of the address panel is in a boxed
style two lined border.

I, with help from Steve Walker (Windsor Philatelics) and Dr Richard J.M.Hobbs, have looked through some 7,500 auction catalogues and dealers lists from the Yates Auction (1949) to date to arrive at a database of 113 Post Magazines. With the examination of scans and actual copies of some 80 of the 113 Post Magazines I have had enough information to look at the various designs of the address panel and the information on each side, and examples of each are shown in the following sheets.

A complete Post Magazine consists of eight pages.

All information and comments are made based on the database of the 113 unused and used Post Magazines recorded up to December 2016. The database is made up of complete or part copies with 82 Type I, 13 Type II, 14 Type III, 2 Type IV, 1 Type IVa and 1 Type unknown.

Phil Cheetham



(link)

Frame 1

  1. Introduction
  2. Type I Decorative Border
  3. Type I Decorative Border
  4. Type I Decorative Border
  5. Type I Decorative Border
  6. Type I Decorative Border
  7. Type I and Type II Decorative Borders
  8. Type II and Type III Decorative Borders
  9. Type III Decorative Border
  10. Type III Decorative Border
  11. Type III Decorative Border
  12. Type III Decorative Border
  13. Type III Decorative Border and Type IV with No Decorative Border
  14. Type IV with No Decorative Border
  15. Type IVa with No Decorative Border
  16. The Post Magazine of 1840 to the Post Magazine of Today