Extra 1/2 franking

Covers and postal matters before 1840.
Post Reply
mcornes
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon May 08, 2023 11:10 pm

Extra 1/2 franking

Post by mcornes »

I have this cover from 1838 marked 8d from the Bank of Scotland so I am assuming that is Edinburgh, to Paisley which is 62 miles. The 8d matches the 50-80 mile band rate for 1838.
Why I am confused is the "Add 1/2" mark. The 1812 rate shows an additional 1/2d for Scotland but not in the 1838 table.

If it was still valid, should it not be marked 8 1/d instead of 8?
Does it mean that 8 1/2d actually paid?
1838 July 18 8d Add half cover front.jpg
1838 8d Ediburgh mark.jpg
1838 8d Paisley Mark.jpg
SteveBUK
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2013 1:15 pm

Re: Extra 1/2 franking

Post by SteveBUK »

I am not a Scottish Postal History expert, but I am sure that the Scottish Wheel Tax applied to all mail within, to, or from Scotland and is usually a hand stamp such as yours, but sometimes added in manuscript.
Winston W
Posts: 108
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2012 6:00 pm
Location: East Anglia

Re: Extra 1/2 franking

Post by Winston W »

mcornes wrote: Fri Nov 10, 2023 4:20 amThe 1812 rate shows an additional 1/2d for Scotland but not in the 1838 table.

If it was still valid, should it not be marked 8 1/d instead of 8?
Does it mean that 8 1/2d actually paid?
You are right, the 1838 table does not show the continuance of the additional ½ for Scotland. However it did continue into 1839 and the "Additional ½d display handout" link on that page corrctly states that the "Halfpenny mail tax discontinued on the introduction of the 4d.Uniform post" on 5 December 1839.

So yes, the recipient paid 8½d, Edinburgh having handstamped the cover with the additional ½d as well as rating it 8.
mcornes
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon May 08, 2023 11:10 pm

Re: Extra 1/2 franking

Post by mcornes »

Thank you for confirming that.
User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 137
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 12:00 am

Re: Extra 1/2 franking

Post by admin »

The notes at the top of the page did describe the additional ½d -- I've expanded them a bit and added a note to the 1812-38 revision to make it clearer that it continued until 1839.
Post Reply